Shipping Container Dimensions & Sizes

Shipping containers come in all shapes and sizes – well, mainly rectangular shapes, but there are many different sizes and materials. How do you know that 40 foot container dimensions are suitable to your shipment? Calculating the right size shipping container can be daunting, so let Cargolia help you out.

Shipping containers are manufactured using square tubing and 3/3” thick non-corrosive steel.The sides are made using 0.075”, 14-gauge, non-corrosive rolled corrugated steel, which adds rigidity when it is welded to the steel frame. The same square tubing is used for the floor, and plywood flooring is screwed to the cross braces.

The corner posts can withstand 153,000 pounds, which allows up to nine containers to be stacked on top of one another.  

Shipping Container Dimensions & Sizes

The Industrial Standards Organization (ISO) specifies that shipping container sizes should follow an international standard. Containers are customized to meet the demands of both international trade importers and exporters. There are twelve different types of ISO containers to choose from, and each is available in a variety of sizes. That means that it’s easy to ship all types of commodities locally and internationally. Some of the ISO containers include:

 

20-foot Dry Container: The 20 ft container dimensions are just over 7’8 x 7’6 x 19’4 and allow enough space for general purpose cargo, or dry cargo.

20-foot Flat Rack Container: The 20-foot flat rack container dimensions allow for the shipping of building supplies, heavy machinery, construction equipment, oversized cargo, or especially heavy loads.

20-foot Container Dimensions (open top): The open-top container allows for top loading by crane or forklift.Open top containers have removable tarpaulin roofs.

20-foot Container Dimensions (ventilated): This option is best for transporting goods that require ventilation, such as coffee beans.

20-foot Container Dimensions (refrigerated): If your cargo requires temperature control, this 20-foot refrigerated container is the way to go.

40 foot Shipping Container Dimensions: The 40 foot shipping container is a general purpose dry container with interior dimensions of just over 7’8” x 7’10” x 37’11”.

40-foot Container (open top):  The open top container makes it easy for loading excessively high or long cargo from the top.

40-foot Container (high cube): The high cube 40-foot container dimensions are bigger than that of the standard 40-foot container.

40-foot Container: Ideal for oversized cargo, construction equipment, and similar supplies.

40-foot Container (refrigerated):  If you have perishable cargo or other types of cargo that require temperature control.

45-foot High Cube General Purpose Container: The 45-foot high cube dry container is best for use with general purpose cargo.

As if the sizes are not confusing enough, containers also have different designs. Tunnel containers have doors at both ends, while others have doors down the entire side – some on both sides! Half-height containers are used for heavy build loads, while tank containers are used for liquids. Then there are bulkers for granular cargoes, coil carriers for coil cargo, and car carriers with collapsible racks used to stack cars inside dry van containers.

 

How to Select the Best Shipping Container by Size

When you want to ship oversized cargo, it is important to determine the best type of container to accommodate the shipment. Ideally, you should submit a specification sheet and photograph of your shipment to the freight broker, who will then book your shipment with a shipping company. You will receive a detailed assessment of the fees to customize your freight solution.

Cargo shipping statistics are calculated in 20-foot equivalent units (TEU). A forty foot container is considered to be two TEUs. New super freighters have allowed for container sizes to be increased to as much as 57 ft.

In some cases, LTL shipping companies carry shared loads in a single container. The cost of this service will depend on the shipping volume.

If business has expanded from LTL container loads to full container load shipments, you’re in luck. Cargolia can help facilitate your shipment, as exact 40-foot container dimensions may vary slightly from one manufacturer to the next. Also, load regulations may restrict operations to less than maximum weight.

Whether you’re shipping less-than-truckload or full truck-loads in a container, it is your responsibility to secure your personal effects or business goods. If you’re sending your less-than-truckload shipment in a shared container, it is crucial to box, crate or palletize your goods. Everything must be labeled as well, or the carrier may not accept the shipment.

 

Tips for Packing Your Container

When trying to fit your goods in the shipping container inside dimensions, it helps to follow these guidelines to ensure everything is protected.

If you’re packing your own shipment, check with your local council to see if you’re allowed to have a 40 foot shipping container sitting near your house or facility until the shipping date. Some shipping companies may require a copy of the permit before they will deliver the container. If fines are issued because you failed to obtain a permit, charges will be billed to you.

It is important to inspect the container upon delivery, before the driver leaves.

Always clean and sweep the container before you start packing your goods.

In most cases, you will have to arrange your own ramps or lifts to access the container, which will be four feet off the ground.

  • Smart packing is key to minimizing any damage to your goods during transit.
  • A tight fitting load is a secure load.
  • It’s always a good idea to start from the front of your container (opposite the doors) and work towards the doors.
  • Stack heavy items on the floor, with lighter boxes on top.
  • You will save space and maximize load capacity by filling all the open spaces between boxes or furniture with light items.
  • Containers typically have loopholes and rings which you can use to secure your items with ratchet straps or rope.
  • You can use 4x4s and plywood to create partitions that are secured in the grooves of the corrugated walls.
  • Nail items to the wood floor of the container to prevent it from shifting.
  • Experts suggest bracing the back of the container using 2x4s or 4x4s.
  • Record the container number and seal number for your records.

Before the driver leaves with your container, be sure to request a waybill as proof that the container has been collected.

Book Your Container Shipping

Confused by the shipping container inside dimensions and types of shipping containers and options available? Not to worry! Cargolia’s expert logistics team is standing by to assist. Contact us now for advice and a free quote!

40 Foot Container Dimensions

Shipping containers come in all shapes and sizes – well, mainly rectangular shapes, but there are many different sizes and materials. How do you know that 40 foot container dimensions are suitable to your shipment? Calculating the right size shipping container can be daunting, so let Cargolia help you out.

Shipping containers are manufactured using square tubing and 3/3” thick non-corrosive steel.The sides are made using 0.075”, 14-gauge, non-corrosive rolled corrugated steel, which adds rigidity when it is welded to the steel frame. The same square tubing is used for the floor, and plywood flooring is screwed to the cross braces.

The corner posts can withstand 153,000 pounds, which allows up to nine containers to be stacked on top of one another.  

Shipping Container Dimensions & Sizes

The Industrial Standards Organization (ISO) specifies that shipping container sizes should follow an international standard. Containers are customized to meet the demands of both international trade importers and exporters. There are twelve different types of ISO containers to choose from, and each is available in a variety of sizes. That means that it’s easy to ship all types of commodities locally and internationally. Some of the ISO containers include:

20-foot Dry Container: The 20 ft container dimensions are just over 7’8 x 7’6 x 19’4 and allow enough space for general purpose cargo, or dry cargo.

20-foot Flat Rack Container: The 20-foot flat rack container dimensions allow for the shipping of building supplies, heavy machinery, construction equipment, oversized cargo, or especially heavy loads.

20-foot Container Dimensions (open top): The open-top container allows for top loading by crane or forklift.Open top containers have removable tarpaulin roofs.

20-foot Container Dimensions (ventilated): This option is best for transporting goods that require ventilation, such as coffee beans.

20-foot Container Dimensions (refrigerated): If your cargo requires temperature control, this 20-foot refrigerated container is the way to go.

40 foot Shipping Container Dimensions: The 40 foot shipping container is a general purpose dry container with interior dimensions of just over 7’8” x 7’10” x 37’11”.

40-foot Container (open top):  The open top container makes it easy for loading excessively high or long cargo from the top.

40-foot Container (high cube): The high cube 40-foot container dimensions are bigger than that of the standard 40-foot container.

40-foot Container: Ideal for oversized cargo, construction equipment, and similar supplies.

40-foot Container (refrigerated):  If you have perishable cargo or other types of cargo that require temperature control.

45-foot High Cube General Purpose Container: The 45-foot high cube dry container is best for use with general purpose cargo.

As if the sizes are not confusing enough, containers also have different designs. Tunnel containers have doors at both ends, while others have doors down the entire side – some on both sides! Half-height containers are used for heavy build loads, while tank containers are used for liquids. Then there are bulkers for granular cargoes, coil carriers for coil cargo, and car carriers with collapsible racks used to stack cars inside dry van containers.

 

How to Select the Best Shipping Container by Size

When you want to ship oversized cargo, it is important to determine the best type of container to accommodate the shipment. Ideally, you should submit a specification sheet and photograph of your shipment to the freight broker, who will then book your shipment with a shipping company. You will receive a detailed assessment of the fees to customize your freight solution.

Cargo shipping statistics are calculated in 20-foot equivalent units (TEU). A forty foot container is considered to be two TEUs. New super freighters have allowed for container sizes to be increased to as much as 57 ft.

In some cases, LTL shipping companies carry shared loads in a single container. The cost of this service will depend on the shipping volume.

If business has expanded from LTL container loads to full container load shipments, you’re in luck. Cargolia can help facilitate your shipment, as exact 40-foot container dimensions may vary slightly from one manufacturer to the next. Also, load regulations may restrict operations to less than maximum weight.

Whether you’re shipping less-than-truckload or full truck-loads in a container, it is your responsibility to secure your personal effects or business goods. If you’re sending your less-than-truckload shipment in a shared container, it is crucial to box, crate or palletize your goods. Everything must be labeled as well, or the carrier may not accept the shipment.

 

Tips for Packing Your Container

When trying to fit your goods in the shipping container inside dimensions, it helps to follow these guidelines to ensure everything is protected.

If you’re packing your own shipment, check with your local council to see if you’re allowed to have a 40 foot shipping container sitting near your house or facility until the shipping date. Some shipping companies may require a copy of the permit before they will deliver the container. If fines are issued because you failed to obtain a permit, charges will be billed to you.

It is important to inspect the container upon delivery, before the driver leaves.

Always clean and sweep the container before you start packing your goods.

In most cases, you will have to arrange your own ramps or lifts to access the container, which will be four feet off the ground.

  • Smart packing is key to minimizing any damage to your goods during transit.
  • A tight fitting load is a secure load.
  • It’s always a good idea to start from the front of your container (opposite the doors) and work towards the doors.
  • Stack heavy items on the floor, with lighter boxes on top.
  • You will save space and maximize load capacity by filling all the open spaces between boxes or furniture with light items.
  • Containers typically have loopholes and rings which you can use to secure your items with ratchet straps or rope.
  • You can use 4x4s and plywood to create partitions that are secured in the grooves of the corrugated walls.
  • Nail items to the wood floor of the container to prevent it from shifting.
  • Experts suggest bracing the back of the container using 2x4s or 4x4s.
  • Record the container number and seal number for your records.

Before the driver leaves with your container, be sure to request a waybill as proof that the container has been collected.

Book Your Container Shipping

Confused by the shipping container inside dimensions and types of shipping containers and options available? Not to worry! Cargolia’s expert logistics team is standing by to assist. Contact us now for advice and a free quote!

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